NABOKV-L discussion

Description

A place for continuing the NABOKV-L discussion online (subscribe)

PALE FIRE allusion to Salinger's Franny and Zooey

Submitted by MARYROSS on Mon, 11/29/2021 - 14:59

     Nabokov’s Pale Fire is replete with allusions to literary greats (and some not-so-greats), as is well known. One allusion that I believe has not been mentioned suggests J. D. Salinger. Salinger was actually one of the few of his contemporaries that Nabokov approved of. They each had a story in The New Yorker’s anthology of the 55 best short stories published from 1940-1950.

PALE FIRE allusion to Salinger's Franny and Zooey

Submitted by MARYROSS on Mon, 11/29/2021 - 14:48

     Nabokov’s Pale Fire is replete with allusions to literary greats (and some not-so-greats), as is well known. One allusion that I believe has not been mentioned suggests J. D. Salinger. Salinger was actually one of the few of his contemporaries that Nabokov approved of. They each had a story in The New Yorker’s anthology of the 55 best short stories published from 1940-1950.

Nabokov's 'Angels' poetry sequence

Submitted by anoushka_alexa… on Fri, 10/22/2021 - 04:49

Hello, I was wondering if anyone had access to, or could let me know where to find, Nabokov's 'Angels' poetry sequence (a set of 9 poems written in 1918 (?). I can't easily find a reference to them anywhere (including Boyd's the Russian Years) so would appreciate any guidance. I worry they are tucked away in an archive somewhere!  I am looking at Nabokov's use of biblical language (and specifically the Wandering Jew) as influenced by Symbolists such as Maximilian Voloshin. 

Thanks :)
Anoushka

(you can email me directly at a.alexander-rose@soton.ac.uk) 

Pale Fire and Lewis Carroll's Sylvie and Bruno books

Submitted by lawrebas on Thu, 09/02/2021 - 05:58

I'm aware of Nabokov's Russian translation of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, and I've come across many references to the role of chess in Pale Fire and Through the Looking-Glass (1871). 

I haven't seen any mention of Pale Fire's structural and thematic similarities with Carroll's later novel(s) Sylvie and Bruno (1889) and Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893). I realise I may be looking in all the wrong places . . . 

Here's a quick overview of the novels' structure:

Sylvie and Bruno

Source for Ada's orchestra/horsecart dream anagram

Submitted by Alain Champlain on Wed, 07/07/2021 - 04:57

As has already been mentioned, in Ada, Part One, Chapter 12, the mention of a hammock begets both these parentheticals:

"(where a former summer guest, with an opera cloak over his clammy nightshirt, had awoken once because a stink bomb had burst among the instruments in the horsecart, and striking a match, Uncle Van had seen the bright blood blotching his pillow)."

"(where that other poor youth had cursed his blood cough and sunk back into dreams of prowling black spumas and a crash of symbols in an orchal orchestra—as suggested to him by career physicians)"

Svengali & Trilby: Mesmerism trope in PF

Submitted by MARYROSS on Wed, 06/30/2021 - 14:33

I happened to come across a reference to “Svengali and Trilby” the other day. I had long been aware of “Svengali” as a sort of mastermind mesmerist, but was not aware that he was fictional – from an 1894 novel by George du Maurier, Trilby. I had never heard the word “trilby” until reading Pale Fire, where I found out it referred to a type of hat  – worn in PF by “the man in brown,” Gradus (in Britain it is called a “brown trilby”).

 

PF's Hazel=FW's Kate

Submitted by MARYROSS on Tue, 06/15/2021 - 19:40

It occurs to me that the image of Hazel as “Mother Time” is an allusion to the character “Kate” the old charwoman in Joyce’s Finnegans Wake. Kate appears with slop pail and broom, and like Time, is always cleaning up the mess after disasters, picking out various detritus which she has been throwing on her garbage heap since the beginning of time. The word “time” is frequently found somewhere near her.

Talk: Dana Dragunoiu on Lolita, 06/15 4:15 pm ET

Submitted by Stanislav_Shvabrin on Thu, 06/10/2021 - 11:37

Tuesday, June 15, 4:15 pm EST

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC)

UNC Center for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies

UNC Russian Flagship Program

present a talk by

Dana DRAGUNOIU (Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada)

“IT HEAVES, MANIFESTS, AND LASTS”: THE CASE OF VLADIMIR NABOKOV’S LOLITA

(Annotation) Ada's Koalas, or "Sentiment" versus "Sensitivity"

Submitted by md143rbh7f on Mon, 05/17/2021 - 19:56

Pertaining to the following quote from Ada, Part 1, Chapter 17:

"I am sentimental," she said. "I could dissect a koala but not its baby. I like the words damozel, eglantine, elegant. I love when you kiss my elongated white hand."

In his Lectures on Russian Literature he pointedly makes clear his views on "sentimentality" and "sensitivity"—and the difference therein: