NABOKV-L post 0002275, Fri, 8 Aug 1997 09:35:37 -0700

Subject
Re: VN Bibliography: PNINIAD CORRECTION (fwd)
Date
Body
> CORRECTION CORRECTION CORRECTION
>
> The E-mail address of the University of Washington Press was
> incorrect in the previous version of this posting. It is given correctly
> in the version below, i.e., <uwpord@u.washington.edu> NOT <uwprod....>
>
> > Galya Diment's PNINIAD: VLADIMIR NABOKOV AND MARC SZEFTEL (University of
> > Washington Press, 1997) is out and can now be purchased directly from the
> > publisher by e-mailing to uwpord@u.washington.edu or calling
> > 1-800-441-4145 (Fax 1-800-669-7993). Foreign orders can be made by calling
> > 206-543-8870 or faxing the order to 206-685-3460. The book is listed at
> > $35 and $4 for shipping. No tax unless the purchaser is a resident of the
> > State of Washington (8.6%). ISBN # 0-295-97634-9. The current UPS strike
> > may delay some deliveries.
> >
> > The book has appendixes one of which contains letters to Marc Szeftel
> > from Nabokov and Roman Jakobson published here for the first time. It also
> > features several pages of illustrations, bibliography, and index.
> >
> > From the Fall/Winter University of Washington Press Catalogue:
> >
> > "In this wry, judiciously balanced and thoughly engaging book, Galya
> > Diment explores the complicated and fascinating relationship between
> > Vladimir Nabokov and his Cornell colleague Marc Szeftel who, in the
> > estimate of many, served as the prototype for Pnin.... Between the two of
> > them, Nabokov and Szeftel embodied much of the complexity and variety of
> > the Russian postrevolution emigre experience in Europe and the United
> > States. Drawing on previously unpublished letters and diaries as well as
> > on interviews with family, friends and colleagues, Diment illuminates a
> > fascinating cultural terrain. PNINIAD -- the epic of Pnin -- begins with
> > Szeftel's early life in Russia and ends with his years in Seattle at the
> > University of Washington, turning pivotally upon the time when Szeftel's
> > and Nabokov's lives intersected at Cornell..."