NABOKV-L post 0007307, Sat, 21 Dec 2002 10:51:30 -0800

Subject
: Encyclopaedia Britannica Article on VN CORRECTION!
Date
Body
----- Original Message -----
From: "Galya Diment" <galya@u.washington.edu>
To: "Vladimir Nabokov Forum" <NABOKV-L@LISTSERV.UCSB.EDU>
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2002 10:40 AM
Subject: Re: Fw: Fw: Encyclopaedia Britannica Article on VN


> ----------------- Message requiring your approval (91
lines) ------------------
> Nope, I said it was a degree in sociology!
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Galya Diment, Professor & Chair,
> Slavic Languages and Literatures
> College of Arts and Sciences
> University of Washington, Box 353580
> Seattle, WA 98195-3580
> Phone: 206-543-7344/206-543-6848
> Fax: 206-543-6009/206-522-1959
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> On Sat, 21 Dec 2002, D. Barton Johnson wrote:
>
> > > -----------------------------
> > > EDNOTE. I happened upon the Nabokov entry in the on-line Encyclopedia
> > Britannica. I don't know what relationship the on-line version has to
the
> > paper one, but the digital version entry is by VN's first biographer
Andrew
> > Field. In general the entry covers the facts but I noted one curiosity
which
> > you will find in the longer paragraph below. Field, as you know, has
been
> > rather harshly treated by several of his critics -- among other things
for
> > some slips about Russian history and VN's personal history.
> > > I daresay, he knows that Pnin is NOT an entomolgist. Pninologist Galya
> > Diment says Pnin has a degree inlaw fromn Prague.Scholars, including the
> > present writer, now and then find that editors do strange things to
their
> > texts. Such may well be the case here.
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > > From: anonymous@britannica.com
> > > To: chtodel@gss.ucsb.edu
> > > Sent: Friday, December 20, 2002 4:57 PM
> > > Subject: Encyclopaedia Britannica Article
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > You can read the whole article online at
> > http://search.eb.com/eb/article?eu=55974.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > ------
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Nabokov, Vladimir
> > > Encyclopц╕dia Britannica Article
> > >
> > >
> > > born April 22, 1899, St. Petersburg, Russia
> > > died July 2, 1977, Montreux, Switz.
> > >
> > >
> > > in full Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov
> > > Russian-born American novelist and critic, the foremost of the
post-1917
> > ц╘migrц╘ authors. He wrote in both Russian and English, and his best
works,
> > including Lolita (1955), feature stylish, intricate literary effects.
> > >
> > > ..........
> > >
> > > while continuing to write poetry, he experimented with drama and even
> > collaborated on several unproduced motion-picture scenarios. By 1925 he
> > settled upon prose as his main genre. His first short story had already
been
> > published in Berlin in 1924. His first novel, Mashenka (Mary), appeared
in
> > 1926; it was avowedly autobiographical and contains descriptions of the
> > young Nabokov's first serious romance as well as of the Nabokov family
> > estate, both of which are also described in Speak, Memory. Nabokov did
not
> > again draw so heavily upon his personal experience as he had in Mashenka
> > until his episodic novel about an ц╘migrц╘ professor of entomology in
the
> > United States, Pnin (1957), which is to some extent based on his
experiences
> > while teaching (1948Б─⌠58) Russian and European literature at Cornell
> > University, Ithaca, N.Y.
> > >
> > > .............................
> > >
> > > Andrew Field
> > >
> > >
> > > To cite this page:
> > > "Nabokov, Vladimir" Encyclopц╕dia Britannica
> > > <http://search.eb.com/eb/article?eu=55974>
> > > [Accessed December 21, 2002].
> > >
> > >
> > > б╘ 2002 Encyclopц╕dia Britannica Inc.
> > >
> >
>