NABOKV-L post 0008750, Wed, 15 Oct 2003 18:59:29 -0700

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Fw: pynchon-l-digest V2 #3606 APLE FIRE
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From: "pynchon-l-digest" <owner-pynchon-l-digest@waste.org>
To: <pynchon-l-digest@waste.org>
Sent: Wednesday, October 15, 2003 3:39 PM
Subject: pynchon-l-digest V2 #3606


> > Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2003 00:10:07 -0700
> From: "Glenn Scheper" <glenn_scheper@earthlink.net>
> Subject: Re: NPPF: Notes Line 286
>
> > Et in Arcadia ego ... the words appear on a scroll issuing from
> > a death's head on a tomb in Arcadia. ... Death is the speaker.
>
> > Shade had written in but struck out namely "The madman's fate."
>
> With AF as poetic death/rebirth, phallus is scroll is tombstone.
> A reflexive sacrifice is also slayer, hence Death. Hell follows.
>
> > ftp://sailor.gutenberg.org/pub/gutenberg/etext95/bucoe10.txt
> Even at 100ms/word, THE ECLOGUES by Virgil shew many AF tropes.
>
> Dante lists Virgil an advanced tantric fellow, up to a point.
>
> This poem lists the advantages of the Pan type over other AF,
> which I recount in my Cernunnos anecdote as arising from male
> discovery of pap suckling, AF juices in eyes, just one part of
> an overall annointing, having spontaneously made paps moisten.
> I also label it the complement to AF, healing that rift of AF.
> Revelation marks it too "What are these, and whence came they?"
> Prior "How long shalt thou not judge, and avenge our blood..."
>
> All with one accord exclaim:
> "From whence this love of thine?"
> Apollo came;
> "Gallus,
> art mad?"
> he cried,
> "thy bosom's care Another love is following."Therewithal
> Silvanus came,
> with rural honours crowned;
> The flowering fennels and tall lilies shook Before him.
> Yea,
> and our own eyes beheld Pan,
> god of Arcady,
> with blood-red juice Of the elder-berry,
> and with vermilion,
> dyed.
> "Wilt ever make an end?"
> quoth he,
> "behold Love recks not aught of it:
> his heart no more With tears is sated than with streams the
> grass,
> Bees with the cytisus,
> or goats with leaves."
> "Yet will ye sing,
> Arcadians,
> of my woes Upon your mountains,"
> sadly he replied-
> "Arcadians,
> that alone have skill to sing.
> O then how softly would my ashes rest,
> If of my love,
> one day,
> your flutes should tell!
>
> So the Arcadians are clearly the simple, non-Pan'ic AF.
> Pan, from his further gnosis, desires to instruct them.
>
> Such Pan has an androgynous aspect, bearing comparisons
> of duality, and crossed types. And the completion heals:
>
> But me mad love of the stern war-god holds Armed amid
> weapons and opposing foes.
>
> and joy to launch Cydonian arrows from a Parthian bow.-
> As if my madness could find healing thus,
>
> Dapnhis and Pan share just the AF part of Pan's gnosis:
>
> Daphnis beneath a rustling ilex-tree Had sat him down; ...
> Arcadians both,
> Ready to sing,
> and in like strain reply.
>
> Daphnis has the usual metamorphosis/katabasis due to AF.
> See the reflexive bending, spear, gnosis of uniqueness.
>
> MOPSUS "For Daphnis cruelly slain wept all the Nymphs-
> Ye hazels,
> bear them witness,
> and ye streams-
> When she,
> his mother,
> clasping in her arms The hapless body of the son she bare,
> To gods and stars unpitying,
> poured her plaint.
> Then,
> Daphnis,
> to the cooling streams were none That drove the pastured
> oxen,
> then no beast Drank of the river,
> or would the grass-blade touch.
> Nay,
> the wild rocks and woods then voiced the roar Of Afric
> lions mourning for thy death.
> Daphnis,
> 'twas thou bad'st yoke to Bacchus'
> car Armenian tigresses,
> lead on the pomp Of revellers,
> and with tender foliage wreathe The bending spear-wands.
> As to trees the vine Is crown of glory,
> as to vines the grape,
> Bulls to the herd,
> to fruitful fields the corn,
> SO THE ONE GLORY OF THINE OWN ART THOU. (My caps)
>
> I suppose ECLOGUES is basic to your literature occupations.
> There were sure lots of "shade" mentions, including final:
>
> These songs,
> Pierian Maids,
> shall it suffice Your poet to have sung,
> the while he sat,
> And of slim mallow wove a basket fine:
> To Gallus ye will magnify their worth,
> Gallus,
> for whom my love grows hour by hour,
> As the green alder shoots in early Spring.
> Come,
> let us rise:
> the shade is wont to be Baneful to singers;
> baneful is the shade Cast by the juniper,
> crops sicken too In shade.
> Now homeward,
> having fed your fill-
> Eve's star is rising-go,
> my she-goats,
> go.
>
> As earlier, comparing bosom to narrow something,
> here slim mallow is where a gal normally spins.
> Also shade recalls the gourd shading Jonah, so
> I suggest it marks AF: whether darkness marks
> Pan'ic or simple AF, I am not ready to guess.
>
> Yours truly,
> Glenn Scheper
> http://home.earthlink.net/~glenn_scheper/
> glenn_scheper + at + earthlink.net
> Copyleft(!) Forward freely.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2003 17:17:58 +1000
> From: jbor <jbor@bigpond.com>
> Subject: NPPF Hazel
>
> Kinbote's note to line 247:
>
> ... Shade's maternal grandmother (a first cousin of Sybil's
> grandfather, if I am not mistaken).
>
> I think Kinbote is insinuating that Hazel's maladies might be the result
of
> in-breeding, a characteristic commonly ascribed to European royalty also.
>
> best
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2003 17:18:24 +1000
> From: jbor <jbor@bigpond.com>
> Subject: Re: NPPF: Notes Line 286/Line 347
>
> on 14/10/03 2:54 AM, Scott Badger wrote:
>
> >> "(Small-fish gesture and wink)...(Pout and shrug)...(Traffic-stopper's
> >> palm)"
> >> Is this pantomime (a) put on for our benefit?
>
> The main thing which struck me about this detailed account of the meeting
> between Oswin Bretwit and Gradus is: How would Kinbote know what happened?
> Bretwit "died under the knife" in hospital on the very next day, and
Gradus
> wouldn't have mentioned the meeting to him, so ....
>
> It's almost as if Kinbote *deliberately* includes these details which show
> the recount up as a fabulation (a bit like that wonderfully droll script
of
> 'The Haunted Barn' he composes a little further ahead).
>
> And how come, when Kinbote cites the "link and bobolink" couplet (lines
> 812-3) the numbers are transposed (812 -> 182 and 813 ->183) and moved to
> the inner margin of the page? Is this a clue to decoding the "secret
design"
> of the ghostly "abracadabra"? Or another red herring?
>
> Great notes by the way. Thanks.
>
> best
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2003 00:32:37 -0700
> From: "Glenn Scheper" <glenn_scheper@earthlink.net>
> Subject: Re: NPPF: Notes Line 286
>
> I had a serendipitous arcadia note weeks ago, but tossed it;
> I could not find its anchor, flipping back and forth in PF.
> Trawling my cache gave more than I could post, so I'm tepid
> about this post trimmed 95%. Tell me if these posts are bad.
>
> http://www.fiu.edu/~mizrachs/poseur3.html
> _PRIORY OF SION: THE FACTS, THE THEORIES, THE MYSTERY_
> moting the mythic theme of Arcadia in Europe, a theme that s
> his painting "Shepherds of Arcadia" depicts an actual tomb,
> rker with the words "Et in Arcadia Ego" from a tomb elsewher
>
> http://www.crystalinks.com/rennes.html
> _Rennes Le Chateau_
> ve library. "Les Bergers d'Arcadie" a painting by Nicolas Po
> oussin This painting shows Arcadian shephards around a tomb
> terious inscription "Et in Arcadia Ego'. This tomb appears t
>
> http://ancienthistory.about.com/library/bl/bl_text_bullfinch_1.htm
> _Bulfinch's Mythology introduction_
> favourite residence was in Arcadia. The Satyrs were deities
> fair trembling Syrinx fled Arcadian Pan, with such a fearful
> calls it also the "Star of Arcady," because Callisto's boy w
>
> http://www.rc.umd.edu/features/rcc/arcadia.html
> _Clayton, "_Arcadia_ in the Romantics Classroom" - Position Papers,
> Romanticism and Contemporary Culture - Features and Events - Romantic
> Circles_
>
> http://www.cgjungpage.org/cc10.html
> _Cross-Currents of Jungian Thought: An Annotated Bibliography--Creativity
> and Jung's Psychology_
> ion of them, Lee describes Arcadia as the land within the im
>
> http://library.floresca.net/1234-1.html
> _On-line Library_
> uperior in strength to the Arcadians, they consulted the Ora
> g conquest of the whole of Arcadia; and the Pythian prophete
> answer thus: "The land of Arcadia thou askest; thou askest
>
> http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~rbear/defence.html
> _Defence of Poesie (Ponsonby, 1595)_
> also began work on the Old Arcadia, which he completed about
> lete, a new version of the Arcadia. Beginning about 1583, it
> mances, including Sidney's Arcadia. {69} Virgil, Aeneid II.
>
> http://ftp.sunet.se/ftp/pub/etext/gutenberg/etext95/homer10.txt
> ter of Lycaon and lived in Arcadia. She chose to occupy hers
> ued by her own son and the Arcadians, was about to be killed
> be (the Pelasgi) were from Arcadia, Ephorus states on the au
>
> http://hsa.brown.edu/~maicar/Pan.html
> _Pan, Greek Mythology Link._
> syrinx O goat-foot God of Arcady ! This modern world is gre
> ay, Ah, leave the hills of Arcady ! This modern world hath n
> Pan fell in love with the Arcadian Nymph Syrinx, an imitato
>
> http://www.mythology.com/bookofwerewolves2.html
> _The Book of Were-Wolves Chapter 2, presented by Mythology Web, February
> 1999_
> hoses," of Lycaon, king of Arcadia, who, entertaining Jupite
> ducted to the brink of the Arcadian lake. He then hung his c
> tus, having assisted at an Arcadian human sacrifice to Jupit
>
> http://www.csun.edu/~hcfll004/herlabor.html
> _Heracles, The Twelve Labors_
> rgos, on the coast road to Arcadia and Sparta) : The Hydra i
> and finally ran it down in Arcadia, beside the River Ladon i
> e River Ladon in northwest Arcadia [Remember: Ladon is the n
>
> http://www.shu.ac.uk/emls/03-2/fittnoct.html
> _[EMLS 3.2 (September, 1997): 2.1-61] The Poetic Nocturne: From Ancient
> Motif to Renaissance Genre_
> sort inspired in Sidney's Arcadia by Philoclea's moonlit gr
> 11. Erwin Panofsky ("Et in Arcadia ego" 346), referring to V
>
> http://www.belinus.co.uk/mythology/Hermes.htm
> _Hermes Thrice Great Main Page_
> y cave on Mount Cyllene in Arcadia, where each night Zeus wo
> e of his cult was probably Arcadia, where Mt. Cyllene was re
>
> http://www.dnafoundation.com/regis/cd228/ijgl/0TRI.HTM
> _Encyclopedia info on Trismegistus_
> highest mount (Cyllene in Arcadia) the legend assigns Herme
> ene, le plus haut sommet d'Arcadie (Peloponese - voire illus
>
> http://bulfinch.org/fables/bull4.html
> _Bulfinch's Mythology, The Age of Fable - Chapter 4 - Juno's Rivals: Io
and
> Callisto; Diana and Actaeon..._
> fair trembling Syrinx fled Arcadian Pan, with such a fearful
>
> http://www.sneaker.net.au/docs/encyclo/D1A.HTM
> _Greek &. Roman Mythology (A-M)_
> became a cobweb . Arcadia Arcadia was a green mountainous i
>
> http://www.bulfinch.org/fables/naiades.html
> _The Naiades (Naiads) - Nymphs of Fresh Water in Greek Mythology_
> island was reamed Aegina. Arcadians claim that the Nomian m
>
> Yours truly,
> Glenn Scheper
> http://home.earthlink.net/~glenn_scheper/
> glenn_scheper + at + earthlink.net
> Copyleft(!) Forward freely.
>
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2003 08:32:19 -0400
> From: "Jasper Fidget" <fakename@verizon.net>
> Subject: RE: NPPF: Notes Line 286/Line 347
>
> > From: owner-pynchon-l@waste.org [mailto:owner-pynchon-l@waste.org] On
> > Behalf Of jbor
> >
> > on 14/10/03 2:54 AM, Scott Badger wrote:
> >
> > >> "(Small-fish gesture and wink)...(Pout and
shrug)...(Traffic-stopper's
> > >> palm)"
> > >> Is this pantomime (a) put on for our benefit?
> >
> > The main thing which struck me about this detailed account of the
meeting
> > between Oswin Bretwit and Gradus is: How would Kinbote know what
happened?
> > Bretwit "died under the knife" in hospital on the very next day, and
> > Gradus
> > wouldn't have mentioned the meeting to him, so ....
> >
> > It's almost as if Kinbote *deliberately* includes these details which
show
> > the recount up as a fabulation (a bit like that wonderfully droll script
> > of
> > 'The Haunted Barn' he composes a little further ahead).
> >
>
> I wondered too about all the details K supplies for Gradus. He does say
on
> p. 299 that he'd had a jailhouse interview with Jack Grey, but then adds:
> "perhaps even two interviews," making that claim suspicious too.
>
> In the Bretwit scene Gradus is at first flat and free of much personality:
> "'How interesting,' said Gradus noting it" (p. 178); then seems to adopt
the
> dialogue of a petty thug criminal, with lines like: "let me tell you
> frankly", "I want to offer you a little arrangement", and "be nice to us
and
> we'll be nice to you"; as well as lots of similar hand gestures. Almost
> like Kinbote morphs Gradus into whatever context the scene implies for
him.
>
> Jasper
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2003 13:57:37 +0000
> From: "Ghetta Life" <ghetta_outta@hotmail.com>
> Subject: RE: NPPF: Notes Line 286/Line 347
>
> >From: "Jasper Fidget" <fakename@verizon.net>
> >
> >I wondered too about all the details K supplies for Gradus. He does say
on
> >p. 299 that he'd had a jailhouse interview with Jack Grey, but then adds:
> >"perhaps even two interviews," making that claim suspicious too.
>
> Kinbote supplies such extensive details about Gradus that it quickly
becomes
> clear that he has to be inventing most if not everything he's telling us
> about Gradus. It in fact makes us wonder if Gradus even exists, which he
> probably doesn't. For those who want a Pynchon connection, Kinbote's
> fictions about Gradus bear a heavy resemblance to Stencil's
> "stencilizations."
>
> Ghetta
>
>>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 2003 14:27:10 -0700
> From: "Keith McMullen" <keithsz@concentric.net>
> Subject: NPPF Main Characters (which see)
>
> GRADUS
> H
> A
> D
> KINBOTE
>
> ------------------------------
>
>