NABOKV-L post 0008744, Tue, 14 Oct 2003 10:44:21 -0700

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Fw: pynchon-l-digest V2 #3603 PALE FIRE
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Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2003 12:00 AM
Subject: pynchon-l-digest V2 #3603


> ------------------------------
>> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 19:10:00 -0700
> From: bekah <bekah0176@sbcglobal.net>
> Subject: RE: NPPF: Notes Line 287-Line 334
>
> At 6:40 PM +0000 10/13/03, Ghetta Life wrote:
> >>From: "Vincent A. Maeder" <vmaeder@cycn-phx.com>
> >>> >
> >>> > "Dr. Ahlert"
> >>> > Ail and hurt.
> >>Or Dr. Alert. Probably both considering Nabokov's penchant for word
play.
> >
> >Or All Hurt (as in he's not good for you)
> >
>
>
> How about "Ah'll hurt," (I'll hurt) as it would be with an only
> somewhat southern "I."
>
> Bekah
>
> ------------------------------
> Date: Sat, 13 Sep 2003 20:51:40 -0700
> From: "Keith McMullen" <keithsz@concentric.net>
> Subject: Re: NPPF: Intertextual Space (Shades Of Gaddis)
>
> "Why has not man a microscopic eye?" writes Alexander Pope; "For this
plain
> reason: man is not a fly." What of Argus, equipped with one hundred eyes
to
> watch over the king's daughter turned into a heifer by a jealous goddess;
> how many images of the heifer did he see? how many leaves to the bracken
> where she browsed? And after the death of Argus (his eyes transplanted to
> the peacock's tail), this wretched heifer, the metamorphosis of Io, was
> visited by a gadfly sent by a jealous goddess, and driven frenzied across
> frontiers until she reached the Nile. What did the gadfly see? And Argus,
> suffering the distraction of one hundred eyes: did he sit steady? or move
> distracted from distraction by distraction, like the housefly now dashing
> and retreating in frenzy against the windowpane, drawn to a new
destination
> the instant it halted, from the shade-pull to the floor, from there to the
> lampshade, back to the baffling window glass. No Argus, this miserable
> Diptera, despite its marvelous eyes guardian of nothing; for where was the
> heifer? Below, perhaps. From the high ceiling the housefly careened to the
> molding across the room, thence to the lampshade, to a green muffler, a
pair
> of socks on the floor, and so to the sleeping face which it attended with
> custodial devotion, until the blinking unmicroscopic eyes came open, and
> Otto lay awake.
>
> The Recognitions
> Wm. Gaddis
> p. 202
>
> ------------------------------
> >
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2003 22:09:21 -0700
> From: Mary Krimmel <mary@krimmel.net>
> Subject: Re: NPPF: Notes Line 286
>
> At 07:39 PM 10/13/03 -0400, Paul Mackin wrote:
> ....
> >In Latin it's Et in Arcadia ego Virgil
> >
> >
> >Also the name of a Poussin painting. (shepherds discovering a tomb)
>
> Can you or anyone tell us the context of Virgil's use of that phrase? Or
> tell us what work it is found in? Was Virgil quoting someone else?
>
> I have understood (from I don't know what sources) that the words are or
> were inscribed on a tombstone and that they are the earliest known written
> Latin; is that correct? The Poussin painting suggests the tombstone, but
> which came first - the fact or generally accepted idea of the tomb, or the
> painting?
>
> Why does there never seem to be any doubt that the "ego" of the phrase is
> Death? Even if there is no doubt that it was carved on a tombstone, that
> seems to me to be no reason to conclude definitely that Death is the
speaker.
>
> Also, I have understood (again, no back-up) that Arcady has the reputation
> of being an idyllic Eden-like spot; is that correct? I.e., does it have
> such a reputation? If so, and if Death is the speaker, the phrase makes a
> poignant point. But it looks to me as though it's often interpreted in
> order to suggest the point, without any real justification.
>
> Mary Krimmel
>
> ------------------------------
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of pynchon-l-digest V2 #3603
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