NABOKV-L post 0011768, Sat, 3 Sep 2005 16:58:56 -0700

Subject
Re: Fwd: Re: Jo Morgan re Michael Maar's evidence on the
Lolita/Lichberg issue.
Date
Body
An excellent point, Jansy, and one that I missed in my response to the Jo
Morgan Lolita/Lichberg embroglio. By the way, Byron received similar
treatment, as a child, I think from a 13-year old servant girl. I would have
to see the girl before deciding on the severity of the abuse.

By the way, I may be mistaken, but I do not think I have seen my own
contribution published on the List.

I may have made some flame-like comments in that message, which could have
led to its being judiciously spiked. It was, as I recall, composed on one of
those nights when I was decidedly worsted in the struggle against my demons.

I'll review it and see if its worth resending after some editing.

Andrew


----- Original Message -----
From: "Donald B. Johnson" <chtodel@gss.ucsb.edu>
To: <NABOKV-L@LISTSERV.UCSB.EDU>
Sent: Friday, September 02, 2005 11:05 PM
Subject: Fwd: Re: Jo Morgan re Michael Maar's evidence on the
Lolita/Lichberg issue.


> In Brazil we have an expression: "Speak ill but still speak about
Brazilian
> cinema" ( "Falem mal mas falem do cinema nacional"). A kind of "lip
service"
> that might help to sell tickets...
>
> In her comment about the Lolita/Lichberg issue, Jo Morgan ("Solving
> Nabokov's Lolita Riddle",2005) brings up her theory about VN´s "strategy
of
> encrypting deliberate 'blunders' across his memoirs" that led her to the
> conclusion that she has "managed to prove that Nabokov wrote Lolita as a
> semi-autobiographical/semi-fictional account of his own terrible
incestuous
> abuse as a boy at the hands of his pedophilic Uncle Ruka".
> In several moments in his memoirs VN quite explicitly mentioned
> "Mademoiselle" as someone who used to touch and caress him to help him
> sleep. He described the smell of enuresis in her room and suggested
delicate
> intimacies, of the kind sometimes praticed by nannies with their young
> charges ( amply illustrated by Freud, by the way).
> His uncle was fabulously wealthy and sophisticated, Mademoiselle was of
> humble origin. VN, while writing about her, was rather compassionate, but
> he was not completely resentful about his Uncle either: he could
recognize
> his ambivalent feelings towards him and express his wish to forget part of
> his experience.
> Why would he then return to them and "encrypt" a message to his readers -
> and why would these refer only to Uncle Ruka?
> Jansy
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Donald B. Johnson" <chtodel@gss.ucsb.edu>
> To: <NABOKV-L@LISTSERV.UCSB.EDU>
> Sent: Friday, September 02, 2005 8:35 PM
> Subject: Jo Morgan re Michael Maar's evidence on the Lolita/Lichberg
issue.
>
>
> > Re the 'outrage'Kunin expects will one day be unleashed over Michael
> Maar's
> > arguments about the connection between VN's Lolita and Lichberg's minor
> > work.
> >
> > I am still waiting for Nabokov's many scholars and fans to show
sufficient
> > interest in my book "Solving Nabokov's Lolita Riddle" (2005). By paying
> > careful attention to Nabokov's well-documented battle against Sigmund
> Freud
> > and his strategy of encrypting deliberate 'blunders' across his memoirs
> > (Speak, Memory/Conclusive Evidence and Eugene Onegin)I have managed to
> > prove that Nabokov wrote Lolita as a
semi-autobiographical/semi-fictional
> > account of his own terrible incestuous abuse as a boy at the hands of
his
> > pedophilic Uncle Ruka.
> >
> > The dangerous confidence trick 'Nabokov the Magician' has pulled on
> > everyone explains: 1) the many gender-bending games the author played
> > around Humbert's 'twofold' nymphet (e.g. Lolita's 'boys knees, her
> 'butcher-
> > boy' pyjamas and 'tomboy shirt'); 2) the author's closing confession in
> his
> > so-called 'novel' Lolita - "I have camouflaged what I could so as not to
> > hurt people"; and 3) Humbert's sly agreement that Lolita can take part
in
> > the Beardsley school play provided that boys parts are taken by girls
> > parts. It also explains the blatant lie Nabokov told in his infamous
> > postscript "On a Book Entitled Lolita" - namely that a US publisher had
> > once proposed he replace his 12 year old girl with a boy.
> >
> > The revelations contained in my book with one day make Maar's work look
> > like the proverbial storm in a tea cup. Please take the time to examine
> > aspects of my analysis on my website www.lolitariddle.com. You can also
> > order copies of my book via the website, if you so wish.
> >
> > With Lolita turning 50 this month, isn't it past time for Nabokov's
'time-
> > bomb' to finally go off?
> >
> > Jo Morgan
> >
> > ----- End forwarded message -----
> >
> >
> >
>
> ----- End forwarded message -----

----- End forwarded message -----