Stan Kelly-Bootle [about a group called "nabokov" and Jack Thorne's play, "Bunny."]..."No convoluted MEANING involved...From what Iíve read, there seems no link between the play's title and Edmund Wilsonís nickname. Now WHY the group called itself nabokov is not entirely clear! As far as I know, thereís no copyright infringement involved in naming a group nabokov."

JM: I'm sure there are plenty of living Nabokovs about, as there are Vladimirs, this is why copyright infringement didn't cross my mind. 
Speaking of names, there's no convoluted meaning (MEANING) here, either:

CK to Line 231: How ludicrous, etc. bringing up a PF variant: He wonders why Shade has left a dash and, passing over "Rabelais" and a mute "e", concludes that "the name required must scan as a trochee." There's a nice irony: "Among the names of celebrated poets, painters, philosophers, etc., known to have become insane or to have sunk into senile imbecility, we find many suitable ones." to fit into the blank but, timorously, he adds:"Or was there something else ó some obscure intuition, some prophetic scruple that prevented him from spelling out the name of an eminent man who happened to be an intimate friend of his?"
 
At least, just as only recently did I learn how to pronounce Kelly-Bootle, Coleridge, Dylan and Bysshe, here Nabůkov's readers are informed about how to pronounce "Kinbote," although the rise and fall of the line remains a problem, like what'd be CK's point by writing this entry.* 
 
 
*- Wiki help informed me that "the Finnish national epic Kalevala...is written in a variation of trochaic tetrameter." CK once mentioned this epic somewhere, but as an indirect return to it, represents another "convolution." Translator's problems with versification (English,Russian, French) are amply discussed by Nabokov, in his letters to Bunny. ( How about that for findig a way to go back to the beginning?)
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